Tag Archives: United States

Recommended Reading for 24 December, 2010

Gentle reader, be cautioned: comments sections on mainstream media sites tend to not be safe and we here at FWD/Forward don’t necessarily endorse all the opinions in these pieces. Let’s jump right in, shall we?

The Broken of Britain: The GP’s Story by Dr Jest

So there you have it. Neither Pete nor Dud would have chosen to be where they are now, and neither has asked not to work when they were capable. Indeed both have rather struggled on when reason would have suggested they ought not. And I could name you a dozen others in a similar position. All present talk of making it more profitable to work than rely on benefit may sound very noble and high minded in the marbled halls of power, where hard graft means having a lot to read and a few late meetings to go to. It completely misses the enormous efforts made by the likes of Pete and Dud to keep going against the odds, and any move to impoverish them is little short of scandalous and should be relentlessly pointed out for the evil narrow minded bigotry it is.

Sarah at Cat in a Dog’s World: PWD and TSA

From information I’d heard from TSA administrators, I thought that the body scanners would reducethe need for physical pat-downs. Little did I know that TSA would use the new technology as an excuse to conduct more invasive pat-downs! It is obscene, especially when one considers that many people with disabilities don’t have any “choice” at all. If someone is unable to stand independently for ten seconds with their arms up, or if one wears any number of medical devices or prostheses…there is no “choice.” (And no, for many people, “don’t fly” is not a realistic choice.) There is, additionally, reason for concern about the radiation from the body scanners, particularly for cancer survivors and people who have a genetic predisposition to cancer. It is now pretty clear that body scanners, far from being a panacea, are making things worse. And people with disabilities are being affected disproportionately.

At Spilt Milk: Thanks for your help, doctor.

Make no mistake: I know that this only happened to me because I am fat. If I were a thin person and I walked through his door with the symptoms I described, he would have been forced to dig deeper. To ask me more questions, to hopefully come up with a wider range of options. Maybe run more tests.

United States: Megan Cottrell at ChicagoNow: Got a disability? You’ll see the difference in your paycheck

A lot of people might assume that if you have a disability, you might not make as much money as someone without a disability. But how much less? How hard is it for people with disabilities in Illinois to get by compared to their neighbors?

India: An unnamed special correspondent at The Hindu: Social barriers keep the disabled away from workforce:

Persons with disabilities are the last identity group to enter the workforce, not because their disability comes in the way of their functioning, but because of social and practical barriers that prevent them from joining work, a study on the ‘Employment Rights of Disabled Women in India’ carried out by the Society for Disability and Rehabilitation of the National Commission for Women (NCW) has said.

Guillermo Contreras at Chron.com: State sued over care for disabled Texans

The federal lawsuit, filed Monday in San Antonio, alleges the state isn’t providing some mentally and physically disabled Texans the opportunity to move into community-based settings, which advocates say are less restrictive and more rehabilitative than nursing homes.

Lastly, here’s a transcript of a story on Australia’s 7.30 Report program called Setting Sail:

Known as the ‘Everest of sailing’ the Sydney to Hobart race challenges the most seasoned of yachtsmen on what can be a treacherous ocean voyage.

Most of the focus is on the big maxi-yachts competing for line honours. But a unique crew of blind and deaf sailors is also commanding attention.

The charity organisation, Sailors With Disabilities, has been gifted a half-million dollar fast yacht, making them eligible for the first time in the prestigious Rolex Cup.

Send your links to recreading[@]disabledfeminists[.]com. Let us know if/how you want to be credited. And have yourself a fabulous weekend.

Signal Boost: United States: Get Restraint and Seclusion Out of Schools!

I’ve been following the Keeping All Students Safe Act, an important piece of legislation for keeping disabled students safe in school. I’m horrified to learn that the Senate version of the bill, S. 3895, actually includes measures allowing for restraint and seclusion, which I missed when I posted about it earlier this year. (Mea culpa!)

“COPAA cannot support the current legislation because S.3895 permits restraint and locked seclusion as planned interventions in students’ education plans, including behavior plans and individualized education programs,” wrote the group’s executive director Denise Marshall. “By allowing restraint and locked seclusion as planned interventions, S.3895 weakens protections under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and legitimizes practices that the bill seeks to prevent.” (source)

If you are a USian with the time, please write your Senators and ask them to remove this portion of the bill. Restraint and locked seclusion are never appropriate for students and they most certainly do not belong in individualised education programmes. It’s time to take abuse off the table when it comes to options for disciplining students!

Signal Boost: United States: AHEAD 2011 Conference on Higher Education and Disability in July

The Conference and Program Committees and the AHEAD Staff are hard at work planning the AHEAD 2011 Conference to make sure attendees have an incredible time, get loads of new invaluable information and resources, meet new colleagues & friends (while reconnecting with “old” ones), and enjoy one of the most beautiful cities in the world.

For purposes of budgeting and planning, the following details may be helpful.

The Conference registration costs will be the same as they have been since 2008. For AHEAD members, the full registration will be US $475.00

The optional, and tremendously valuable, preconference institutes (between ½ and 2 full days) will cost between US $95 and US $295 depending on session selections for AHEAD members; again retaining 2008 pricing.

While nearly all events associated with the Conference will be held at the Washington Convention Center, housing for Conference attendees will be at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel (across one side street from the Convention Center). AHEAD has negotiated deeply discounted room rates for both single and double occupancy at US $199.00 + tax.

The overall schedule for the Conference will be:

Monday, July 11th: Preconference Institutes
Tuesday, July 12th: Preconference Institutes (Daytime) Welcome Reception (Evening)
Wednesday, July 13th: Keynote, Concurrent Sessions, Posters, Exhibits, Reception
Thursday, July 14th: Concurrent Sessions, Posters, Exhibits
Friday, July 15th: Concurrent Sessions, Posters, Banquet
Saturday, July 16th: Concurrent Sessions, Closing Plenary (ends at Noon)

If you need to register way in advance in order to encumber funds well in advance, please download the Advance Registration Form and submit it to the AHEAD Office with payment at your convenience. If you need special financial arrangements, please contact AHEAD’s Associate Director, Oanh Huynh, directly.

As always, if AHEAD may be of any assistance in your planning – please feel welcome to contact the AHEAD office at (v/t) 704-947-7779.

We look forward to seeing you in Seattle for
AHEAD 2011: Sustainable Access through Partnership!

Tons more information at the AHEAD website!

Recommended Reading for 17 December, 2010

Gentle reader, be cautioned: comments sections on mainstream media sites tend to not be safe and we here at FWD/Forward don’t necessarily endorse all the opinions in these pieces. Let’s jump right in, shall we?

United States: Tampa’s ‘Sensitive Santa’ allows children with autism to get photographs, too by Shelley Rossetter at the St Petersburg Times:

The mall’s owner, Glimcher Realty Trust of Ohio, started Sensitive Santa in some malls nationwide two years ago and extended the idea to all its properties this year, said Kristy Genna, marketing director for WestShore Plaza.

Ireland: Deaf man can sit on jury, says judge by Eithne Donnellan at the Irish Times:

A HIGH Court Judge has ruled for the first time that a deaf person can sit on a jury in the Central Criminal Court.

Mr Justice Paul Carney yesterday ruled that profoundly deaf teacher Senan Dunne could sit on a trial jury with the aid of a sign language interpreter. He said objections to having a “13th person in the jury room” in the form of a sign language interpreter could be met by the signer taking an oath of confidentiality and the jury foreman ensuring that she or he was confined to translating what went on.

Just updating you on the situation in Sierra Leone (see RR for 3 December): In Sierra Leone, Disability Congress Writes President Koroma by Abdul Karim Fonti Kabia at the Awareness Times:

The NDC highlighted that persons with disabilities remain severely under-represented in political and decision-making positions; disabled hold only 0.01% of parliamentary seats, and; the current representation of disable persons in cabinet is at 0.0%.

Indonesia: City to Soon Issue Bylaw on Disabilities at BeritaJakarta.com

As form of its attention to the disabled, Jakarta capital city government plans to implement local regulations on building facilities and accessibility for the disabled, including the sanctions for the violators. At present, there are approximately 35 thousand disabled people in five administrative areas of Jakarta.

Australia: ‘Warringah Council is seeking feedback on design concepts for the Collaroy Disability Tourism Precinct,’ something you can read about in Disability precinct design feedback wanted at the Manly Daily. Also see Windfall for disabled, also by Brenton Cherry at the Manly Daily:

The vision is to create a holiday destination for people with disabilities and their carers as well as a specialist economic business hub for Collaroy.

It would be a place where not only access to the beach, including to the water using an amphibious wheelchair, is possible, but also restaurants, public transport, accommodation and entertainment facilities.

Here’s the page on the Warringah Council website. Collaroy is a beautiful place on Sydney’s Northern Beaches. I am so excited to hear about this proposal, and hope that more people will be able to enjoy that stunning beach!

Send your links to recreading[@]disabledfeminists[.]com. Let us know if/how you want to be credited. And have yourself a fabulous weekend.

Recommended Reading for 3 December, 2010

Gentle reader, be cautioned: comments sections on mainstream media sites tend to not be safe and we here at FWD/Forward don’t necessarily endorse all the opinions in these pieces. Let’s jump right in, shall we?

It’s Your Fault! by that stunning and mysterious being, Chally, at the Don’t DIS My ABILITY blog:

The thing is, people with a disability need accommodations. Accommodations aren’t optional extras, they aren’t something we can give up if we try a bit harder. Neither are we out to get all the money/spots/benefits at the expense of the rest of the population.

Despite his disability, he wages war on HIV (I know, horrible title) by Chaitra Devarhubli at DNA India:

[Amrut] Desai visits various villages in Gujarat, where he conducts programmes on AIDS and educates villagers regarding the same.

UK: Access All Areas: Disability survey

Some 90% of people surveyed by the BBC believe the government should provide funds to make the workplace accessible for people with disabilities.

But 40% felt disabled people turned down job offers even when they were physically capable of doing them.

Deaf moviegoers sue Cinemark theater chain at the Associated Press (US):

Kevin Knestrick, an attorney for the plaintiffs, says Cinemark Holdings Inc. is the only one of the nation’s three largest movie chains not to offer closed-captioning equipment.

Sierra Leone: Disability Bill might become an Act on Friday by Poindexter Sama at Awoko:

it will institute, upon its enactment, a Disabled Commission, provide free education and vocational training for persons with disabilities at required levels, make provision for free medical care, ensure mobility in public buildings and public transports and a host of other facilities necessary for disabilities in all forms.

Send your links to recreading[@]disabledfeminists[.]com. Let us know if/how you want to be credited.

Signal Boost: 2010 TASH Conference in Colorado

The 35th Annual TASH Conference will be in Denver, Colorado – December 7- 11, 2010. The conference will focus on encouraging inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the workplace, at school and in the community. The conference will include several half-day workshops such as, “Supporting all Young Children within Inclusive Early Child Programs,” “Designing Individualized Behavior Support Strategies,” and “What Does the Future Hold? Making the Transition to Support Adulthood” plus a self-advocate forum and community living sessions and more than 150 peer reviewed sessions.

More information about the conference, including a programme, here.

Recommended Reading for 25 November, 2010

Gentle reader, be cautioned: comments sections on mainstream media sites tend to not be safe and we here at FWD/Forward don’t necessarily endorse all the opinions in these pieces. Let’s jump right in, shall we?

disability is a feminist issue by Wheelchair Dancer:

This conversation is an icon in the difficult relations of disability and feminism.

Study: Too Many Fat Women Don’t Even Know They’re Fat by Cara at The Curvature:

Trying to define and impose your definition of normal on other people — whether it be in relation to gender, sexuality, physical ability, neurological workings, weight, or some other category entirely, is alienating, damaging, and oppressive. There’s no way that defining people in opposition to “normal” and telling them that they must become normal for their own good is not harmful.

Access and Academia, Again by Liz at Dis/Embody:

Though it’s lamentable that this is necessary, twenty years after the ADA, these cases are exactly the kind of potentially broad-ranging challenges that could strengthen the civil rights protections of the ADA and the accessibility processes used in US institutes of higher education.

Boy With Disability Unable To Leave Apartment by Katie E. at Women’s Glib:

Denial of accessibility is a widespread issue for people with disabilities. Jaime’s education and right to leave his apartment is seen as trivial to the leasing office, but it is very, very important. Why should he be treated as a second-class citizen? Why don’t all people have a right to education?

In a first, Census 2011 to mark people with multiple disability by Surbhi Khyati at The Indian Express:

For the first time in India, people with multiple disability will be a part of Census 2011. The census will not only include the number of people in each disabled category but also recognise diseases like dyslexia and autism as forms of disability.

That’s all for this time. Send your links to recreading[@]disabledfeminists[.]com. Let us know if/how you want to be credited.

Signal Boost: United States: Ninth Annual Tennessee Disability MegaConference in June 2011

The Tennessee Disability MegaConference is Tennessee’s largest disability-specific conference for individuals with disabilities, families, and professionals.  At the conference, people share the latest information and innovations on many topics including housing, employment, education, health care, recreation and leisure, mental health, and others.  Continuing education credits are offered in many categories.  People attending make new friends and important connections as everyone works together to encourage the full participation of all people with disabilities in their own lives!

More information here!

Congratulations, Gregory Hlibok!

Gregory Hlibok, for those who do not know (and there’s no particular reason you should!) is a Deaf attorney who was just appointed to head the disability rights office at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States.

This is news for two important reasons.

1. The FCC is responsible for regulating communications in the United States, including addressing issues like providing mandatory subtitling on media, approving designs for accessible telecommunications devices, and other such matters. Having a disability rights office is a good thing, because the FCC’s work directly impacts people with disabilities. Having a disabled person head that office? Even better.

2. This is the first time the head of the FCC’s disability rights office has been a disabled person. The reason they thought it might be a good idea to get a PWD heading the office? Because they are getting ready to start work on developing a framework for enforcing the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act, and, hey, maybe a disabled person would know a little something something about that kind of thing!

What does the disability rights office do, exactly? Some important stuff:

According to its website, the DRO addresses disability-related telecommunications matters, including telecommunications relay service, access to telecommunications equipment and services by people with disabilities, access to emergency information, and closed captioning. In addition, DRO provides expert advice and assistance on issues relevant to people with disabilities, and initiates rule making for the development of policies to ensure that communications are accessible to this population. (source)

Hlibok is a pretty great candidate for this job, I have to say. He’s not just a Deaf attorney with almost 10 years of experience in the disability rights office; he’s also been an activist for Deaf rights in the United States. In 1988, he acted as a spokesperson for the Deaf President Now movement at Gallaudet.

“Greg will be heading up the Disability Rights Office at a crucial time, as the FCC ramps up to implement the most significant disability law in two decades,” said FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski in a press release. “Greg possesses extensive knowledge in the field of telecommunications access for people with disabilities as well as the leadership qualities necessary to lead the office.” (source)

He sounds like the right person to get the job done. It’s a pity that the FCC apparently didn’t think it was necessary to have a person with disabilities heading the disability rights office until they were faced with a major disability-related law they have to enforce. Yet another reminder that it is generally assumed we don’t need to advocate for ourselves and certainly won’t have anything to add to discussions about our lives.

I wish Mr. Hlibok success in his new job position, and I’m really looking forward to the changes in telecommunications and media communication in the United States that are going to come about as a result of this landmark legislation.

Dear Political Left: Enough With the Scooter Hate, Already

Every time there’s some political event where a bunch of people gather, some of those people are going to be using scooters (and wheelchairs! and canes! and walkers! etc.). And, invariably, people who disagree with the politics of that event are going to zero in on the scooter users, targeting them as objects of hatred and rage because, well, they’re there. And they’re convenient. From the political left, which prides itself on its ‘sensitivity’ and ‘respect for all people, even people it disagrees with,’ this is especially galling.

Thanks to the tea party in the United States, which is on the rise, there are plenty of events for people to pick from when it comes to selecting the ‘perfect’ scooter user to abuse. Here’s what I’ve learned about people who use scooters, from my fellow people on the political left: they’re old1 and/or fat, lazy, and stupid.

The scooter hate never seems to get old, and people never seem to think there’s any problem with it. It’s gotten to the point where when I’m on a liberal website and I see a picture of a scooter user, I scroll by really quickly so I don’t have to read the caption/commentary, because I already know what it’s going to say. There will be, say, a picture of an older person on a scooter, holding up a sign protesting government health care, and the caption will talk about how stupid and hypocritical the person is, sitting on a Medicare-funded scooter and bleating about government health care (I had no idea you could tell a scooter is funded by Medicare just by looking at it!).

I disagree with a lot of the politics on the right in this country. Vehemently. Just for example, the entrenched opposition to government-funded health care. But while I may disagree with the ideas being espoused by a particular political sign, I attack the sign, not the person holding it. I’m more interested in confronting and engaging with the ideas these people are promoting and I find it, well, interesting that many people on the left apparently aren’t interested in ideas, they’re interested in attacking people. It would be just as easy to challenge the assertions made on the sign without dehumanising the person holding it, but people seem to  have a hard time with this concept.

Now, the left is not alone in this. Scooter hatred is pretty universal. I’ve seen plenty of hateful stuff from the right, too, and I’m not giving the right a free pass here, but since I am a member of the left, I feel like it behooves me to talk about how people who share my politics need to clean house before I go storming over to the right to tell them what’s what. The fact that there are a myriad of left-slanting scooter hate pages on Facebook tells me we have a long way to go when it comes to confronting the deeply embedded ableism on the left.

There are a lot of examples of ableism on the left. Writing about liberal ableism, Annaham says:

For these liberals, everyone deserves respect and opportunity — so it follows that disabled people absolutely deserve to participate in society! Until, of course, accommodations for PWDs conflict with the desired pacing or focus of the liberals in question — or until the PWD no longer conforms to the “angelic” and/or “in need of uplift by the kind liberals” image. Yet often, these same liberals still insist that they can’t be ableist — they’re so progressive!

And, of course, there’s that very distinctive subset of liberal ableism, hipster ableism:

The most insidious thing, for me, about hipster ableism and other hipster -isms is that they are a thinly veiled way to continue being a prejudiced bigot. People can go right on thinking their prejudiced thoughts, and they can hide behind the shield of “humour” and “you just don’t get it” when they are challenged. Hipster ableism, far from being edgy and transgressive, is in fact very safe and affirming.

No indeed, the left is no stranger to bigotry and hatred shielded behind ‘jokes.’ People abuse scooter users in no uncertain terms, making it clear that they view them as subhuman, as worthless, despite the fact that, gasp, some people who use scooters? Are also members of the political left. And are perhaps not stoked at behind characterised the way scooter users routinely are by other members of the left.

This country prides itself on a premise of ‘lively political discussion,’ claiming that even people who disagree can have productive conversations about political issues and ideas. Dehumanising people is not my idea of ‘lively political discussion.’ In fact, it’s pretty much the opposite. When all you have to say in response to political ideas you don’t like is ‘you are not a human being and you are disgusting and you should die,’ that pretty much tells me that you are incapable of engaging politically with people.

Here’s Bill Maher on scooter users, in a quote drawn to my attention by Lauredhel:

New rule: If horror zombies really want to scare me, they have to walk faster. I don’t even have to run from zombies. I can saunter, amble, stroll, promenade, stop for coffee at Peet’s. Zombies, you may be a disgusting, barely ambulatory member of the undead, but so is this guy-[slide of overweight man riding motorized scooter-chair]-and he can catch me.

Leftie favourite Wonkette:

Oh, ye Armies of the Night! Rise up … or, hell, just remain seated. Remain seated, ye lardbottoms, and also stick to daylight hours, so you don’t run into each other, on those ridiculous scooters paid for by Socialist Medicare.

Wonkette also publishes and makes fun of emails from users asking them to reconsider their hateful language on scooter users. This is just the tip of the iceberg, people. I’ve lost count of the number of sites I’ve stopped reading specifically because of the way they talk about scooter users, let alone the other countless examples of ableism strewn across their pages.

Seriously, stop with the scooter hatred already. I don’t know how else to say it. I could say it’s boring, trite, and overdone. I could point out that you are assaulting people in your own movement, people who share your politics and want to engage on the same level you do with the political system in your country. I could talk about how it makes it look like you can’t defend your political ideals, when you can’t even muster a response to opposing politics. Or I could just say that as soon as the scooter hate comes out, I tune out, because I know that you have nothing of interest to say to me.

  1. A nebulous concept that seems to shift across decades depending on who is speaking