Category Archives: signal boost

Signal Boost: International Network of Women with Disabilities

The International Network of Women with Disabilities (INWWD) is a group of of international, regional, national or local organizations, groups or networks of women with disabilities, as well as individual women with disabilities and our allies. The mission of the INWWD is to enable women with disabilities to share our knowledge and experience, enhance our capacity to speak up for our rights, empower ourselves to bring about positive change and inclusion in our communities and to promote our involvement in relevant politics at all levels, towards creating a more just and fair world that acknowledges disability and gender, justice, and human rights. We are a group for women only. We invite ALL women with disabilities to join us and we will achieve these goals TOGETHER.

INWWD Yahoo! Group

I’m a member of this group. They spent a lot of time this year developing some excellent documents for the UN regarding women with disabilities as victims of violence.

Signal Boost: SUPERFEST International Disability Film Festival Calls for Entries

Via Email

Your Opportunity to Contribute to Disability Culture

SUPERFEST, the world’s longest-running juried international disability film festival, is seeking your entry for submission to our 2011 film competition. SUPERFEST is the primary international showcase for innovative films that portray disability culture and experience in all its diverse, complex, and empowering facets.

This year we have selected a theme for Superfest: CHILDREN & YOUTH.
Work must be about, feature or be appropriate for children or youth (up to age 24).
Continue reading Signal Boost: SUPERFEST International Disability Film Festival Calls for Entries

Signal Boost: United States: Get Restraint and Seclusion Out of Schools!

I’ve been following the Keeping All Students Safe Act, an important piece of legislation for keeping disabled students safe in school. I’m horrified to learn that the Senate version of the bill, S. 3895, actually includes measures allowing for restraint and seclusion, which I missed when I posted about it earlier this year. (Mea culpa!)

“COPAA cannot support the current legislation because S.3895 permits restraint and locked seclusion as planned interventions in students’ education plans, including behavior plans and individualized education programs,” wrote the group’s executive director Denise Marshall. “By allowing restraint and locked seclusion as planned interventions, S.3895 weakens protections under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and legitimizes practices that the bill seeks to prevent.” (source)

If you are a USian with the time, please write your Senators and ask them to remove this portion of the bill. Restraint and locked seclusion are never appropriate for students and they most certainly do not belong in individualised education programmes. It’s time to take abuse off the table when it comes to options for disciplining students!

Signal Boost: United States: AHEAD 2011 Conference on Higher Education and Disability in July

The Conference and Program Committees and the AHEAD Staff are hard at work planning the AHEAD 2011 Conference to make sure attendees have an incredible time, get loads of new invaluable information and resources, meet new colleagues & friends (while reconnecting with “old” ones), and enjoy one of the most beautiful cities in the world.

For purposes of budgeting and planning, the following details may be helpful.

The Conference registration costs will be the same as they have been since 2008. For AHEAD members, the full registration will be US $475.00

The optional, and tremendously valuable, preconference institutes (between ½ and 2 full days) will cost between US $95 and US $295 depending on session selections for AHEAD members; again retaining 2008 pricing.

While nearly all events associated with the Conference will be held at the Washington Convention Center, housing for Conference attendees will be at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel (across one side street from the Convention Center). AHEAD has negotiated deeply discounted room rates for both single and double occupancy at US $199.00 + tax.

The overall schedule for the Conference will be:

Monday, July 11th: Preconference Institutes
Tuesday, July 12th: Preconference Institutes (Daytime) Welcome Reception (Evening)
Wednesday, July 13th: Keynote, Concurrent Sessions, Posters, Exhibits, Reception
Thursday, July 14th: Concurrent Sessions, Posters, Exhibits
Friday, July 15th: Concurrent Sessions, Posters, Banquet
Saturday, July 16th: Concurrent Sessions, Closing Plenary (ends at Noon)

If you need to register way in advance in order to encumber funds well in advance, please download the Advance Registration Form and submit it to the AHEAD Office with payment at your convenience. If you need special financial arrangements, please contact AHEAD’s Associate Director, Oanh Huynh, directly.

As always, if AHEAD may be of any assistance in your planning – please feel welcome to contact the AHEAD office at (v/t) 704-947-7779.

We look forward to seeing you in Seattle for
AHEAD 2011: Sustainable Access through Partnership!

Tons more information at the AHEAD website!

Signal Boost: Canada: 2011 Women’s Worlds Conference in July

The 2011 Women’s Worlds Conference is taking place in Ottowa from 3-7 July, 2011. Here’s some information about the theme of the conference, which may be relevant to some of our readers!

Inclusions, exclusions, and seclusions: Living in a globalized world

The theme of Women’s Worlds 2011 is “Inclusions, exclusions, and seclusions: Living in a globalized world”. Why? Where globalization and women are concerned, provocative questions abound:

Does globalization include, exclude, and/or seclude women?

As global hierarchies realign, how are gender roles and identities evolving?

How are social identifications like power, privilege, citizenship, and nation affected?

Ours is an increasingly integrated world – one where boundaries are shifting under growing flows of capital, goods, power … and people. Who and where we are as individuals and communities becomes less clear within this contemporary, globalized context.

Around the world, women are grappling with changing political, cultural, economic, social, and environmental realities. And the effects of numerous crises – be they economic, ecological, or health-related – intensify obstacles to women’s equality.

Globalization has contributed to the destabilization and marginalization of women and communities. Yet certain consequences have yielded positive results for women. Globalization has meant enhanced communications and organizing – trans-national connectivity that must be deepened as women’s organizations and networks struggle to sustain themselves and maintain resilience in the face of forces that oppose women’s equality.

Women’s Worlds 2011 will be a place for the exploration of these complex matters through reflection, learning, and sharing a variety of ideas and experiences – especially those of women most deeply affected.

Information about attending the conference can be found here.

Are you (or someone you know) aged 13 – 30 and living in the US?

We mentioned this when the first Call came out for proposals, but I wanted to mention it again because I think it’s a good opportunity for the “new generation” of people with disabilities to get their thoughts and voices out there. (Also, I want to read it when it is done, so people submitting to it = better chance of it getting published!)

Call for Proposals: Disability in America: Voices of a New Generation

Ari Ne’eman and Stacey Milbern, Co-Editors
Deadline: January 15, 2011

This year, the disability community is celebrating the 20th anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), civil rights law that protects the rights of disabled people.

Growing up in a post-ADA America has meant that many of us have had access to more opportunities than previous generations. We know if we had been born in 1967 instead of 1987 our lives would look completely different. We know the history of our people is tainted by eugenics, ableism, lack of access and the sting of low expectations. We recognize the work that has been done by disability movements over the last century to make the current lives we live possible. We are proud to be members of this vibrant, breathing, community.

Although the struggle continues, we recognize that the realities of disabled people look vastly different in many ways. With this in mind, we are requesting proposals for chapters in a book-length anthology to document this legacy and record the stories of disabled young people talking about what it is to grow up with a disability in this day and age.

Part One of our anthology will attempt to explore how a new generation experiences these age old challenges, affording a chance to assess how far we have really come. Part Two of our anthology asks disabled young people to identify what our struggle looks like now.

We’re seeking a diversity of perspectives and topics. A few questions we pose as food for thought:

What does it look like to navigate the medical system?
What is it like trying to find and keep a job as a young person with a disability today?
How are mental health challenges and psychiatric impairments approached by family members?
Do students still have to choose between support and inclusion?
What is the impact of pity and charity?
How do we survive the traumas we experience by people who say they are helping us, whether this is in schools, in doctor?s offices, our places
of worship, or within our support systems?
How do people with less visible disabilities choose whether or not to
disclose?
How has the nature of “passing” changed or not changed?
How do we fight eugenics, with its many faces?
How do we work with personal assistant services and our support systems?
How is disability portrayed differently in American society?
How are media, and pop culture representations of disability viewed by the new generation of young people with disabilities?
What do our relationships and sex lives look like?
How do we find community?

We are seeking creative non-fiction essays from young people with disabilities ages 13-30 (some flexibility will be available for compelling submissions from individuals slightly outside our preferred age range). People with all types of disabilities are welcome to submit. Speaking from personal experience is strongly encouraged. The intent of this project is to use personal voices to capture the experience of the new generation of young people with disabilities.

Submissions should range from 2,000 to 5,000 words. Please include your address, phone number, e-mail address and a short bio on the manuscript.

Proposals are due by e-mail to voicesoftheadageneration@gmail.com to January 15, 2011 but we encourage and will consider for approval early submissions. Please e-mail co-editors Stacey Milbern and Ari Ne’eman at voicesoftheadageneration@gmail.com with questions.

Signal Boost: Call For Participation: Spectral Amoebas – A Blog Carnival about Asexuality and the Autism Spectrum

We are asexual bloggers on the autistic spectrum who want to explore the intersection between autistic and asexual identities.  The basis of this project is to have a conversation about our unique experiences being autistic and asexual without looking for a “cause”.  We want to create a safe, non-judgmental space to talk about the issues that affect us.  If you identify as asexual (or demisexual, or gray-a) and as on the autistic spectrum (diagnosed or not, AS, autism, PDD-NOS, NLD), you are invited to write a blog post for this project. If you are not asexual and autistic you are welcome to contribute provided you focus on the issues experienced by this particular intersection. The scope of the project is general, and open to any experiences of being autistic and asexual.

However, please keep in mind that asexuality here is to be discussed as a sexual orientation in its own right, not as discussion of the desexualization imposed on autistic people by mainstream culture.

More details at Writing From Factor X!

Signal Boost: 2010 TASH Conference in Colorado

The 35th Annual TASH Conference will be in Denver, Colorado – December 7- 11, 2010. The conference will focus on encouraging inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the workplace, at school and in the community. The conference will include several half-day workshops such as, “Supporting all Young Children within Inclusive Early Child Programs,” “Designing Individualized Behavior Support Strategies,” and “What Does the Future Hold? Making the Transition to Support Adulthood” plus a self-advocate forum and community living sessions and more than 150 peer reviewed sessions.

More information about the conference, including a programme, here.

Signal Boost: Employment Survey for People With Mobility Impairments

If you have a mobility impairment and limitation, you may be eligible to participate in a new research project. This research aims to understand how people with mobility impairments and limitations accomplish job tasks, how their environment affects their worksite participation, and what, if any, help they need to complete employment activities.

Eligibility requires that you:

  • Have a mobility impairment and limitation (difficulty moving legs and/or arms)
  • Be employed for at least 2 years at your current job
  • Work at least 20 hours per week regularly at your current job
  • Be 18 years of age or older
  • Have access to a computer
  • Can read at or above the 6th grade level
  • Can enter responses into a web-based survey or direct another individual to enter your responses into a web-based survey

If eligibility is established, you will receive a code to log on to the survey site and complete the study. Qualified participants will be asked to complete the survey a second time in 4-6 weeks. All information will be kept confidential and no connection between you and your survey answers will be made. Participants will be reimbursed for their time and effort. The web-based assessment will take approximately one hour to complete.

Link to the survey is here, as always, FWD/Forward does not have any additional information about this survey, and you are encouraged to contact the organisers if you have questions or concerns.