Recommended reading for Monday, May 24 2010

A service pup in training
Description: An Arizona Golden puppy wearing a Halter that reads “Service Dogs Helping Others Improve Their Lives”

From flickr user Cobolt 123, used under a Creative Commons License.

Teacher duct tapes disabled boy’s arm to wheelchair

Anthony Birden, a 12 year old with shaken baby syndrome, who can only communicate with his right hand, had that hand restrained with duct tape by a teacher in Colorado. Teacher Leslie Garcia said it was the only way she could make him stop doing a gagging movement. The boy’s grandmother says that is the way the child communicates.

The district attorney decided not to charge the teacher. However, the incident continues to be investigated by the Center for People with Disabilities, who believe the act is against state law. After they submit a report, they will follow up with the school. A review by the federal office of civil rights may take place.

Checking Assumptions (at the door!)

Today we have a poll!

I want you to read the scenario described below and then answer the poll questions as you read them. Please answer AS YOU READ, don’t read all the questions before you answer and please don’t read the comments before you answer!

War and Disability in Afghanistan

This article offers insight into day-to-day issues facing ordinary disabled people in different parts of the world. And it manages to avoid the melodrama that peace advocates sometimes invoke when talking about disabilities caused by war.

Even as we fight our own critical battles for civil rights and essential support services, disability rights activists must be aware of the impact of our government’s military actions on people with disabilities across the globe.

Hilary Beaumont has written a three-part article for the Halifax Media Co-Op on Rape: Part 1. Part 2. Part 3.

Via Sharon Wachsler in comments:
The Voices Behind the Disease

I want to give others a chance to use their own voice. I know that while my writing may be useful, everyone’s journey, story, experiences and needs are different. What I experience and what I say may not apply to everyone else. I wanted to help others voice their own account of Lyme and the affect that it has had on their own life, and what they wish that their friends and family would understand. It is my hope, that if I put together the words of more than one Lyme patient, I’ll be able to paint a vivid picture of the disease and its many shapes, forms and effects. We will be able to paint a vivid picture of the disease, not only for Lyme Disease Awareness Month, but for the understanding and support that every Lyme patient needs and deserves.

I posed a question: What is one thing that you wish your family and friends understood about your disease and how it has affected your daily life?

I’d like to share the answers with you.

I’ve been really enjoying some of the stuff coming my way via @disabilitygov on twitter. It’s US-based, but at least some of it is applicable to other countries as well.

Best Practices Guide in Mentoring Youth with Disabilities [link is to description, the guide itself is available in PDF & Word] I’ve only skimmed the 145-page document, but it’s reminded me how much I want to do some Mentoring programs once I settle down in one place.

A guide on best practices and programs for mentoring young people with disabilities, including suggestions on starting or expanding a program to include youth with disabilities

They’re doing a 100 Days to the ADA blog that may also be of interest.

Have you been reading RMJ’s TelevIsm posts at Bitch Blog?

In the News:

Henderson: Finding the right word to describe the disabled is often a struggle

Alberta Must Restore sex-change funding

By 24 May, 2010.    recommended reading   



1 Comment

  1. D’you think people would be as blase if the teacher had duct taped a child’s mouth shut, instead?