15 responses to “Come filk with us – “Special Treatment” for PWD”

  1. attack_laurel

    I get told to deal with it
    we’ve all got problems, they say
    I’m too much trouble, should just shut up
    And hide myself away

    How dare I ask for special treatment
    Special treatment
    Very special treatment

    (I’m not entirely sure it scans, but…)

  2. romham

    ugh. that was just a mess. thanks for the link

  3. thetroubleis

    Lovely. Asking for first and last names is way out of line, even if they aren’t posted, but I went over and commented, becuase the writer needs to read this.

  4. thetroubleis

    That is to say, I’m attempting to comment, if I get approved.

  5. Kao

    Both the original Special Treatment and the PWD filk variant have me in tears. Really evocative, really heartbreaking. I think the PWD variant hits me harder because I have a mobility impairment myself, and it’s all too painful to think of things I may not be able to do with my kids, once I have kids.

    I’m rather flummoxed by the idea of a blog requiring a full RL name for commenting. And frankly, I’m flummoxed and offended by that post suggesting that being fat is like being a wheelchair user or other disabled person, especially considering how ignorant the author is of the reality of disabled life. Being disabled has always been defined as “bad”, it’s always been wrapped up in horrific mistreatment by society with little to no recourse. I feel fetishized and objectified by the phrasing in the Big Fat Blog post, like the author is coveting access to accommodations that I don’t even get – even though I legally am due them.

  6. Fitz Clementine

    I was a kid, I went to school,
    I learned a lot of things in there.
    Learned crying was against the rules,
    if I got beat up no one cared.

    They claimed it wasn’t special treatment
    Special treatment
    Very special treatment

    (This one could apply to a lot of people, sadly, disabled or not…)

  7. Meg Thornton

    I have to edit verse 1 of the filk – it doesn’t quite scan on line three. So here’s the rewrite:

    I can’t enter my child’s classroom
    Although the door’s right there
    I’m stuck outside my child’s classroom
    Blocked by a single stair

    (*grin* Told you it was a first draft.)

  8. NameSignNotHave

    I got stopped by the nice policeman
    Although I couldn’t hear
    ‘Twas a lovely gunshot wound
    I never knew the charges

    I got special treatment
    Special treatment
    Very special treatment

  9. Fire Fly

    So disability is not your analogy, but racism is? Or do you feel like you need to erase ATSI people from music in order to make space for (white) PWD?
    .-= Fire Fly´s last blog ..Request: STFU =-.

  10. romham

    Fire Fly…good point.

  11. Fire Fly

    Chally’s post didn’t say anything about trivialisation, it talked about appropriation, which then goes on to delegitimise the ability of PWD to assert their experiences as unique. I read the post as being mostly about appropriation, and mentioning delegitimation as one of the possible outcomes of appropriation of disability as an analogy for repression and/or oppression.

    I’m aware that PWD are resented by TAB people for reasonable accommodations made for PWD. No need for whitesplaining on that account.

    Since you seem to have missed it, I’ll repeat my original question, which you still haven’t answered: do you feel like you need to erase ATSI people from music in order to make space for (white) PWD?
    .-= Fire Fly´s last blog ..Request: STFU =-.

  12. romham

    “do you feel like you need to erase ATSI people from music in order to make space for (white) PWD?”

    definitely a question id like to see thoughts on here. thanks for repeating it.
    personally, i dont need or want to be doing that, and if i find myself doing it or am called out as doing it, i want to check my shit quicklike.

  13. Fire Fly

    In that case, why are you doing it?

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