Quotation: Why We Do Disability History

[I promise that I am so close to being done all this reading that there will soon be less quotation-posts, but I keep finding all these lovely words, and I’m very fond of them.]

Reminders of the immediate relevance of history to contemporary issues of disability confront us daily. In but the latest example, as we write these words [in 2001], the United States Supreme Court has accepted appeals from several states which claim that Congress exceeded its constitutional authority in imposing the ADA [Americans with Disabilities Act] on the states. Congress lacked evidence to prove that state governments had engaged in a historical pattern of discrimination against persons with disabilities, this argument claims in part; without evidence of state discrimination, the general government overran its jurisdiction. The essays gathered here indicate that evidence of discrimination against disabled people reaches well beyond our living recollection. Until we can document the past with the evidence and rigor that solid historical research necessitates, the absence of disability from our written history, its suppression in our formal collective memory, jeopardizes the current quest of Americans with disabilities for full citizenship. This history matters, and not in the abstract.

– Paul K. Longmore & Lauri Umansky, The New Disability History: American Perspectives, pg 14. Sadly, there is no limited preview of this book on Google Books, but Why I Burned By Book and other essays on disability, by Longmore, does have limited preview, and I love that book to pieces, especially the last essay.

Obviously I have quoted this for truth because I’m an historian and I’m often questioned on why I consider the history I do to be both political and activist in nature. And, this is (in part) why.

By 13 December, 2009.    anna history rants, history, Quotations  ,  



5 Comments

  1. Thank you for more lovely words! I have been appreciating and sharing them. And your recommendation of “Why I Burned My Book” is the final push I needed to add it to my list of books for my independent study, so thanks for that too!

  2. If you’re looking for a list of disability-related academic books, I can happily share my refworks file with you. 🙂

  3. I would so completely totally love that! Thank you!!

  4. I want to read this book now. Thanks for the recommendation.
    .-= Sarah´s last blog ..Is there really a problem with diagnostic "abuse"? =-.

  5. Don’t let me forget, Assiya – I’ll put it into a useable file tomorrow.