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FWD Retrospective Week: Accessibility Edition

FWD Retrospective Week: Accessibility Edition

Welcome to FWD retrospective week! We’ve taking a look back at some of our favourite posts on a variety of themes over the next week.

s.e. smith:

Accessibility Policies Done Right: The Legion of Honor in San Francisco

I think that this policy really speaks to the amount of activism which the disability community has been involved in across the Bay Area. In Berkeley in particular, people with disabilities have been very active and very outspoken and have played a major role in shaping policy and pushing for accessibility. The Legion of Honor’s policy isn’t the result of forward-thinking museum employees, it’s the result of pressure from the community and efforts to increase awareness of disability issues.

Accessibility Is So Much More Than Ramps

Considerations about accessibility and accessible spaces should be on the forefront of the mind of anyone tasked with building, arranging, or coordinating a space, not just people who need accommodations, and people need to expand the way they think about accessibility, actively seek out and solicit information to make the spaces they control better. People often seem to think that accessibility is something you add when someone asks for it, which presumes that people with disabilities will always ask for it, when instead, more commonly, we go ‘oh, that space isn’t accessible or there’s not clear information about accessibility, so I won’t bother attending that event.

I’m Disabled and I Vote

An estimated 20% of the population of the United States is disabled. That’s a pretty big percentage of the electorate. Given that we are not actually a hivemind, it’s safe to assume that we have some very diverse views on politics and that those of us who do vote probably vote very differently. Those of us who can’t vote would vote differently as well, if they were given an opportunity to do so. It’s important to make sure that these voices are heard, to ensure that votes are cast not only by people who can walk up the stairs to a polling place, stand at a polling booth, and interact with a touchscreen or paper ballot, but by everyone.

lauredhel

Am J Cardiol concern-trolling: “But mobility aids will stop them EXERCISING!”

Researchers are urging doctors to consider the risks of scooter use before making recommendations to patients invest in a scooter.

“*Doubletake*”, thought I. “Doctors should consider the risks? Doctors? Not, say, people with disabilities? Just doctors? Doctors should weigh up the risks before offering any options at all? Doctors should decide?”

It’s a scooter, not a Mack truck

Something I’ve noticed a lot since starting to drive a scooter is how TERRIFIED people are.

Activism suggestion: How about shade for “accessible” parking spots?

Parked cars in the Australian sun get way too hot at the best of times, no matter how able-bodied you are. But lots of people with disabilities have further issues with temperature regulation and/or high temperatures making them sick. People with spinal injuries can have major issues keeping their body temperature stable. People with multiple sclerosis can be made very ill very suddenly by overheating. People with CFS or fibro can have similar issues with temperature regulation or overheating. Head injuries or Parkinson’s disease or stroke or diabetes or lung cancer or extensive burns scars or who take certain medications can all reduce a person’s ability to stay safe in the heat.

Anna:

Accessibility is not an individual problem

We don’t act like putting a door in the front of our building is a favour we are doing. We assume that doors are necessary. And yet, people treat having a ramp to that door as a favour they are doing, when the ramp serves the same purpose: it allows people to come inside.

Politicians Care So Much They Make Their Message Nonsense

Every political party in Canada “cares” about “the disabled”. They really do. Each one has a little subsection of their website dedicated to explaining how they “care” about “the disabled”.

I think it would be awesome instead of telling me how much they cared, they’d show it. And one way of doing that would be subtitling their ads, so everyone can know what their message is.

abby jean:

How Can We Get More Bilingual Health Providers?

The report lists 39 distinct languages and almost 10,000 residents speak another language not on the list. About 29% of county residents are Limited English Proficient (LEP), which means they have some degree of difficulty communicating in English. All of these people will have some contact with the health care system at some point in their lives and ideally, at more than one point.

Shame and Blame with African-Americans and Mental Health: Let the Circle be Unbroken

To me, all of this suggests that the psychiatric profession hasn’t really figured out how to provide psychiatric treatment and care of the African-American population with the African-American individual’s best interests in mind. History speaks to using psychiatry to control, torture, sedate, and oppress African-Americans, even creating fictionalized diagnoses to help support the structures of slavery.


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